You are here: Home About Us People Collaborators

copy_of_ScorpianFishThomasSharpMarinePhotobank_cut.jpg

Collaborators

Ragnar Árnason

University of Iceland

Ragnar Árnason, born in 1949, graduated in economics and politics from the University of Iceland and in economics and econometrics from the London School of Economics before completing his Ph.D. in economics from the University of British Columbia, specializing in the mathematical modelling of fisheries. Dr. Árnason is a Professor of Fisheries Economics at the University of Iceland and the author of many academic papers on fisheries management.  He has served on the supervisory board of Iceland’s Central Bank since 2009, as well as the Academic Council of the Research Centre for Innovation and Economic Growth, a free-market think tank. He has been an adviser on fisheries management to governments around the world and to international organisations.  In 2011, Ragnar Árnason received the Kjartan Gunnarsson Freedom Prize of the Young Independents for his work to support individual liberties.  His work has been influential in the research conducted by SFG, and he is a frequent collaborator and advisor on empirical projects.

Contact Information:
email: ragnara[at]hi.is

Jacy Brunkow

Latin American Fisheries Fellowship Program

Originally from Portland, Oregon, Jacy came to the Bren School as a Latin American Fisheries Fellow after spending several years submerged in the marine conservation space of Mexico’s Gulf of California. He worked as both a field station manager and field instructor teaching undergraduate marine conservation courses for Prescott College. He received a Bachelor’s in Conservation Biology and Latin American Studies, and a Masters specializing in Coastal Marine Resources Management from the Bren School. Jacy’s graduate project applied tradeoff analyses to evaluate bioeconomic outcomes for an array of fisheries and vaquita conservation policies in the northern gulf. As the Program Manager for the Latin American Fisheries Fellowship Program—a collaboration between the Bren School, SFG, and the Walton Foundation—Jacy is particularly excited to find ways to grow and leverage an emerging network of interdisciplinary marine resource management leaders, with an aim to achieve greater outcomes for sustainable resource management and coastal livelihoods across Latin America.

Contact Information:
office: Bren Hall 4526
email: jbrunkow@bren.ucsb.edu

Chuck Cook

The Nature Conservancy

Chuck_web.jpg

Chuck, a 30-year veteran of The Nature Conservancy, is a marine and fisheries conservation practitioner that works in tropical and temperate ocean environments with a strong focus on fisheries reform and habitat protection. Over the past 15 years, Chuck has concentrated his efforts on improving the economic and environmental performance of the west coast groundfish fishery, anchoveta fishery in the Humboldt Current and coral reef fisheries in Indonesia and Micronesia. More recently, Chuck’s professional focus has been on the design, development and implementation of market and incentive based solutions to ocean and fishing concerns. Between 2007-2010, Chuck was the Project Leader for The Sustainable Fisheries Group at UCSB, where we encouraged the use of emerging market based tools that better align the economic interests of fishermen with the health of the ocean. Chuck earned his BS in 1974 from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in Animal Science and Husbandry. He earned his MS in 1977 from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a Major in Agricultural Biology, Minor in Ecology.

Contact Information:
email: ccook@tnc.org

Florian Diekert

Postdoctoral Researcher

Florian is a postdoctoral researcher from Oslo, Norway. He is an economist working on a variety of issues related to renewable resources, with a focus in fisheries. Florian grew up in Germany and studied International Relations in Dresden. He obtained his PhD from the University of Oslo in 2011 where he was the first student to be co-supervised by both economists and biologists. As a collaborator with SFG, Florian will continue his research agenda on the interplay between regime-shift risk and strategic interactions, as well as open up new collaborations that relate to questions about the sustainable management of natural resources.

Contact Information:
email: f.k.diekert[at]ibv.uio.no

Ben Halpern

University of California, Santa Barbara

Ben Halpern focuses his research at the interface of marine ecology and conservation planning. His research has addressed a broad range of questions that span local to global scales, including spatial population dynamics, trophic interactions in community ecology, and the interface between ecology and human dynamics, all with the ultimate aim of informing and facilitating conservation and resource management efforts in marine systems. After receiving his PhD in 2003, he held a joint post-doctoral fellowship at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and the Smith Fellowship Program sponsored by The Nature Conservancy. He was a research associate at NCEAS until 2013 and then appointed professor at the Bren School and part-time chair in marine conservation at Imperial College in London. He also serves as director of the Center for Marine Assessment and Planning (CMAP) at UCSB, and has been the lead scientist for the Ocean Health Index project.

Contact Information:
office: Bren Hall 4420
email: halpern@bren.ucsb.edu

Ray Hilborn

University of Washington

Ray Hilborn is a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, specializing in natural resource management and conservation. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in food sustainability, conservation and quantitative population dynamics.  He has received the Volvo Environmental Prize, the American Fisheries Societies Award of Excellence, The Ecological Society of America’s Sustainability Science Award and the American Institute of Fisheries Research Biologists Outstanding Achievement Award for his pioneering work on assessment and management of global fisheries.    A longtime collaborator with SFG, he is the co-author of several books and has published over 250 peer reviewed articles on the subject.  Ray is a Fellow of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Contact Information:
email: rayh@u.washington.edu

Carrie Kappel

National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis

Carrie Kappel is an Associate Project Scientist and Center Associate at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis and a member of the Center for Marine Assessment and Planning at UC Santa Barbara. A marine conservation biologist and community ecologist by training, she has worked in coral reefs, kelp forests and rocky intertidal systems and now uses collaborative synthesis science to develop conservation solutions that protect marine ecosystems and enhance human wellbeing. Carrie currently leads a multi-institution collaboration called the Ocean Tipping Points project, which is aimed at integrating our growing understanding of tipping points in marine ecosystems into ocean management through practical tools and approaches. She also serves on the Science Advisory Council for SNAP: Science for Nature and People, drawing upon her long history participating in and leading NCEAS working groups and other interdisciplinary, collaborative team science projects. Carrie received her B.S. from Brown University and her Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Contact Information:
email: kappel@nceas.ucsb.edu

Sarah Lester

Assistant Professor, Florida State University

Sarah received her BS from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her PhD in marine ecology from UC Santa Barbara. For her dissertation research, she studied the role of dispersal ability in determining geographic range size for marine taxa and large-scale patterns of reproductive output in intertidal invertebrates. Following her PhD, she was the Project Manger for the California Current Ecosystem-Based Management (CCEBM) initiative, a collaborative effort to synthesize, advance, and communicate the natural and social science needed for more comprehensive ecosystem-based management along the U.S. west coast. Prior to taking up a faculty appointment in Florida, Sarah served as the Research and Program Director of the Sustainable Fisheries Group for several years, supporting science communications and working with on-the-ground partners to connect science and research to the implementation of conservation and sustainable fisheries projects. She continues to collaborate closely with SFG on marine spatial planning and aquaculture development in the greater Caribbean region. Her recent research has focused on the ecological effects of marine protected areas, applying tradeoff analysis to marine resource management and spatial planning, sustainable fisheries management, and ecosystem-based management. She has also worked as scientific staff for the Ocean Health Index project.

Contact Information:
email: slester[at]fsu.edu
website: http://geography.fsu.edu/people/sarah-lester/

John Lynham

University of Hawai'i

John is an Associate Professor in the Economics Department at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, as well as a UHERO Research Fellow and member of the Graduate Ocean Policy Certificate (GOPC) faculty. His interests lie in environmental/resource economics, marine ecology and behavioral economics. In addition to his long-standing collaboration with the Sustainable Fisheries Group, John is an Affiliated Researcher at the Center for Ocean Solutions at Stanford University and has held regular Visiting Professor appointments in the Economics Department and the Program in Human Biology at Stanford. John earned his MA and PhD in Economics from the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), as well as a Masters degree in Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology.  He was recently honored as a Pacific Century Fellow (2012) and received the Board of Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Teaching in 2013.

Contact Information:
email: lynham@hawaii.edu

Bruno Nkuiya

University of Alberta

Bruno is an Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Alberta. His research agenda broadly covers topics in environmental economics and natural resource economics.  His research combines issues related to industrial pollution control under international trade, adaptation, uncertainty and risk, game theory, applied econometrics, and the bio-economic modeling of antibiotic use subject to bacterial resistance. His recent work has focused on how environmental policies should be adapted in response to threats of regime shifts such as climate change. Bruno has also tested empirically whether various assumptions adopted in theoretical models match patterns observed in data.  He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Montreal, and worked as a postdoctoral researcher with the Sustainable Fisheries Group before accepting a faculty position in Alberta. Bruno's recent research focus has been on the design of fisheries policies to balance conservation, environmental, and economic goals.​ He also addresses the effects of property rights on the utilization of natural resources under various environmental conditions.

Contact Information:
email: nkuiyamb[at]ualberta.ca

Pablo Obregon

Partner Conservationist

Originally from Colombia, Pablo has also lived in Europe and the United States, where he received a BS in Biochemistry from Bowdoin College in 2009.  He returned to Colombia to apply his knowledge of molecular biology to coral restoration and aquaculture projects, and developed a strong interest in the design and implementation of market-based, ecologically-sound strategies to ensure the sustainable use of marine resources. Pablo was selected for a Latin American Fisheries Fellowship at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he received a Master's of Environmental Science and Management (MESM) degree.  Over the past three years, he has worked with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, Rare, and Conservation International, most recently supporting the Ocean Health Index program in Latin America.  He has also actively pursued entrepreneurial ventures based on the thesis he co-authored at UCSB, "Promoting sustainable development in ecologically vulnerable areas through ecotourism," and is currently in negotiations to establish a model site in Nicaragua. In April 2015, Pablo moved to the Galapagos Islands to support the Galapagos Marine Reserve re-zoning efforts in partnership with the Sustainable Fisheries Group, Conservation International and the Galapagos National Park.

Contact Information:
email: pobregon1@gmail.com

Elena Ojea

Future Oceans Lab

Elena Ojea is a researcher at the University of Vigo in Spain holding a European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant since 2016. She leads the new born Future Oceans Lab that addresses marine research on climate change adaptation in socio-ecological systems, ecosystem services, and economic instruments for policy decision making. Before coming to Vigo, Elena was a research fellow at the  Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3), and a visiting scholar at the Bren School for Environmental Science and Management for consecutive years. Elena is very interested in fisheries management under future changing environmental conditions and collaborates with SFG in projects for adapting fisheries management to climate change. See more information here.

 

Contact Information:
website: elenaojea.org
email: elenaojea[at]uvigo.es

Andrew Rassweiler

Chuck_web.jpg

Florida State University

Andrew, aka Rass, earned a BA in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University. As an undergraduate, he studied coral reef fish population dynamics in Curacao, bird mate selection in Mexico, and rodent foraging ecology in Kenya. He earned a PhD from UCSB in marine ecology in 2008; his dissertation focused on distinct alternate community states occurring in California subtidal reef ecosystems. He used both empirical and theoretical tools to explore the mechanisms maintaining community states and the environmental factors capable of triggering state changes. He also worked as a researcher for the Santa Barbara Coastal LTER project, studying kelp forest primary production and giant kelp population dynamics. After earning his PhD, Andrew was a postdoctoral researcher with SFG. His research has focused on spatial fisheries management, strategic design of MPA networks to meet fisheries and conservation goals, how to quantify the effect of MPAs in achieving fishery sustainability, the value of information in spatial management plans, and the value of environment forecasts for managing fisheries in dynamic systems. He has also worked on a number of important applied projects, such as developing spatial models of fish population dynamics to evaluate stakeholder proposals for MPA networks in California state waters. Andrew went on to work as a Project Scientist at UCSB’s Marine Science Institute, analyzing long-term monitoring data from kelp forests in southern and central California, before accepting an Assistant Professor position at Florida State University.

Contact Information:
email: rassweiler[at]bio.fsu.edu

Hugo Salgado

Universidad la Talca

hugosalgado_crop.jpgHugo serves as the Vice-Chancellor of Management and Finance at the University of Talca, in Chile.  A fisheries economist by training, his research interests focus on the use of property rights to manage fisheries, as well as the use of economic incentives for environmental regulation.  In his new research partnership with the Chilean Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), he uses empirical methods to investigate the socio-economic sustainability of aquaculture. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 2008, having previously obtained a Bachelor in Economics and a Master in Environmental Economics in Chile. Hugo has been collaborating with SFG since 2010,  working with Chris Costello and Steve Gaines on research related to the use of MPAs to manage transboundary fisheries in Latin America.  He has taught courses and advised Master and Ph.D. students at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB.

Contact information:
email: hsalgadoc@gmail.com

Kent Strauss

Environmental Defense Fund

Kent is a fisheries and oceans specialist with Environmental Defense Fund, where he studies global experiences in fisheries management to inform the design of policies and institutions that can achieve environmental and economic sustainability. Collaborating with SFG, Kent’s research focuses on fisheries economics, institutional design, and bio-economic modeling. Kent is a co-author of EDF’s Catch Share Design Manual, a synthesis of the experience of hundreds of global fisheries using rights-based management, and of Towards Investment in Sustainable Fisheries, a framework for financing sustainable fisheries. Prior to joining Environmental Defense Fund in 2012, Kent served as a consultant to several non-profits and academic universities, helping these institutions draw the connection between fisheries management, environmental markets and performance outcomes. He graduated from the University of Oregon in 2008 with a BS in Economics.

Contact information:
email: kstrauss@edf.org

Crow White

California Polytechnic State University

Chuck_web.jpg

Crow is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo that continues to collaborate with the Sustainable Fisheries Group. Crow received his BA in Biology from the University of Oregon Robert D. Clark Honors College, his MS in Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana, and his PhD in Ecology from UCSB. For his masters research, he studied elk management in Grand Teton National Park. For his dissertation research, he studied the population connectivity of coastal marine species and the efficacy of marine reserves for increasing fishery profit. The overarching conceptual theme of Crow’s research is to quantify the interactions between and among ecological communities and human users, and identify how the implications of these interactions can be used to guide natural resource management. He is especially interested in how spatial fisheries management strategies – in particular coupling spatial closures (MPAs) with spatial property rights (TURFs) – can be designed optimally for achieving conservation and socioeconomic objectives in marine ecosystems. His research often utilizes decision theory, portfolio theory, ecosystem-service tradeoff analysis, and marine spatial planning approaches for quantifying fishermen incentives, predicting fishery-ecosystem interactions, mediating user group conflicts and guiding decision-making toward effective management.

Contact Information:
email: cwhite31@calpoly.edu

Jono Wilson

The Nature Conservancy

Jono is a fisheries ecologist working jointly with The Nature Conservancy and SFG.  His research involves a blend of quantitative and empirical approaches to conservation and fisheries management issues.  He received BA degrees in Environmental Studies and Business/Economics from UCSB in 2000, an MS in Biology from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in 2006, and a PhD in Environmental Science and Management from UCSB in 2011.  Recent work has involved design and simulation testing of novel fisheries management strategies, integrating marine reserves into fisheries management, and identifying the appropriate spatial scale with which to manage.  Along these lines he has worked with fishing communities in California to facilitate a transition to local, community-based management.

Contact Information:
office: Bren Hall 3021
email: jono_wilson@tnc.org